Spaghetti Carbonara

When I was in college, I read Ruth Reichel’s book Garlic and Sapphires. It was assigned reading for some class, though I can’t remember what course I took where reading a food critic’s book would have been an appropriate assignment.

In the same class, I read a book about a woman who spent some time as a flight attendant. She may or may not have liked being a flight attendant.

Clearly that class really prepared me for the world.

Anyway.

Ruth Reichel, acclaimed author and chef, wrote in her book that her favorite go-to meal when she needed something fast was spaghetti carbonara. She described it in the book. It sounded gross.

It took me until two years ago to decide to try it, and two years to get to a happy place with my recipe.

I won’t lie, this is probably the quickest pasta dish I’ve ever made, the ingredients are all things I nearly always have on hand, and it tastes great. My husband (who loves pasta in any form, for any meal, under any circumstance) agrees.

We’re prepping to leave for an adventurous vacation (sorry to my three dedicated readers, blog posts will be few and far between for a few weeks – pictures after!), and I happened to have some bacon that needed eating in the fridge (I know). So this was about the most convenient Sunday night meal I’ve ever made.

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Seriously, this is your sauce: eggs and parmesan cheese. Maybe some salt + pepper.

While the pasta is boiling, beat two eggs and some parmesan cheese together, and crisp up some garlic-y bacon.

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It’s been awhile since I’ve graced this blog with a gratuitous bacon shot.

Once the pasta is cooked, everything needs to be combined quickly. The heat of the pasta will cook the eggs. Cold pasta won’t cook anything, so, you know – stir fast!

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I used angel hair pasta, which I don’t remember buying, but had an open box of. Use whatever pasta you like (spaghetti being the “correct” choice).

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Dump sauce on hot pasta.

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Engage tongs to mix.

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Add bacon. And some more parm. And some parsley.

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Dinner!

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Steak Sandwiches with Spicy Honey Mustard

Spicy honey mustard is a thing, right? I’m not so revolutionary as to have invented a new condiment. I’m just not that clever.

Steak sandwiches were always a staple in my house as a kid. My Dad loved them (so did my Mom), and we as kids HATED them. My parents had a very strict “you have to try it policy,” so I am at a loss for how I tried a steak sandwich and did not like it.

All these years later, I feel the loss of all the steak sandwiches I could have eaten as a child.

And I must make up for it.

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Maybe I was against onions and peppers as a kid?

These are NOT Philly cheesesteaks. For that, you’ll need to go to Philly. Or find someone from Philly. Or just coat this in Cheese Whiz and then cry yourself to sleep.

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I use a steak sandwich process that I assume was patented by my mother.

Once the onions and peppers start to soften, push them to one side of the pan. Add the steak. Let it cook. Flip it over. Then mix the cooked steak in with the peppers and onions. Push everything to the side, and repeat the process until all of the steak is cooked.

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Hungry?

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Too many close ups of the same thing? Oh well. I was hungry, and now I’m looking at these and wondering if there are any leftovers in the fridge.

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Ignore my lightly singed bread, yet another casualty of my inability to use the broiler properly. (Don’t be like me: lower your oven racks and set a timer!!)Steak Sandwiches.png